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Ramael opened his first solo venture the eponymous, Scully in March this year after working as Yotam Ottolenghi’s right hand man for 12 years.

Based in St James’ Market, Scully’s restaurant is a hub for informal yet refined dining with a fusion of bold and globally inspired flavours that critic Tim Hayward, writing for the Financial Times describes as “some of the craziest and most inspired work [he’s] seen”.

“some of the craziest and most inspired work [he’s] seen”.

Scully was born in Malaysia and brought up in Sydney by his Chinese-Indian mother and Irish-Balinese father. Ramael’s first insight in to international food was at big fortnightly family lunches where all his mother’s nine sisters would each bring a dish of either Chinses or Indian origin. This introduction, as well as cooking for his own sister while their mother worked long hours, inspired Scully’s desire to explore different cultures and sparked his culinary adventure realising he could travel and work in kitchens around the world.

 

Scully was born in Malaysia and brought up in Sydney by his Chinese-Indian mother and Irish-Balinese father. Ramael’s first insight in to international food was at big fortnightly family lunches where all his mother’s nine sisters would each bring a dish of either Chinses or Indian origin. This introduction, as well as cooking for his own sister while their mother worked long hours, inspired Scully’s desire to explore different cultures and sparked his culinary adventure realising he could travel and work in kitchens around the world.

The term fusion was not unfamiliar to Scully having lived in Australia and New Zealand which are deemed as cultural melting pots but his real understanding of integrating ingredients and flavours stemmed from working in the Middle East, Russia, Hong Kong, France and Germany. Ramael began to build on this knowledge in 2005 when he moved to Britain to work at Ottolenghi’s Islington outpost.

Ramael refers to Yotam as a friend and mentor and claims he has one of the greatest palettes he’s ever come across. Together they capitalised on the similarities between Middle Eastern, Mediterranean and Asian cuisines and forged a deeper level of knowledge around depth of flavour and this word ‘fusion’ that’s previously had a fairly bad ‘rep’ for being a fine line between getting a dish very right or very wrong. Scully was quick to add that “sometimes it didn’t work but you’d learn from it and move on”.

In 2011, Scully became head chef at Ottolenghi’s new restaurant Nopi which is known for traditional Middle Eastern staples as well as Ramael’s Asian-inspired pantry. Last year, with Ottolengi’s blessing, Scully began to develop his own restaurant concept based around seasonal produce, realistic inner City sourcing requirements and most importantly, the ultimate pantry and one that’s not just for show.

Ramael says “…a pantry should be at the heart of any kitchen, built with essential ingredients that then become the basis for future dishes.”

Scully’s food is intelligently choreographed with elegance and complexity. He uses layers of ingredients to build flavour and in some cases has pickled or preserved the produce for up to 8 months before it features on the menu. Being based in central London, Scully uses his pantry to his advantage so he’s not always relying on fresh produce deliveries which is where we step. Scully uses a range of our products including Spanish varietal vinegars for pickling for example.

Sustainability is at the heart of Scully’s restaurant and, has always been a personal interest too, Scully mentioned that “if [he] wasn’t a chef that [he] would’ve been a marine biologist to help save the world.” Ramael explained that “we need to be teaching the next generation about waste and how we can really use every part of an ingredient for example, using fish guts to make a garum sauce or simply dehydrating vegetable peels to enhance stocks, sauces, pickles and powders.”.

To this day Scully’s mum is still his biggest inspiration and critic(!), she lives in Sydney and in Scully’s downtime, she’ll be on the phone as a sounding board for unusual ideas and creative twists. We use the word downtime very loosely as in his time off, Scully is always researching, reading cookery books – he recommended a book called Chicken and Charcoal, by Matt Arbergel, a chef based in Hong Kong – consulting, or training new or aspiring chefs.

You’ll want to eat everything on the menu but a stand out dish was definitely the unique fusion of the Columbian-inspired Arepa that is served with a Malaysian eggplant sambal and Middle Eastern Bergamot Labneh.